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Tuesday, July 19
 

7:30am

8:00am

Meeting Welcome and Overview
Watch it live (and after the meeting) here -> http://commons.esipfed.org/node/9014

Speakers
avatar for Steve Diggs

Steve Diggs

Technical Director, CCHDO, Scripps Institution of Oceanography / UCSD
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Tuesday July 19, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Grand Ballroom

8:30am

Educator's Workshop: Testing & Polishing STEM Activities for Recreational Drones
Fifteen educators selected through our application process will test and refine a range of activity ideas. Participants will make plans for facilitating STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) investigations using recreational drones in clubs, classrooms, and / or science fairs. Participants will also learn about ESIP projects and initiatives that provide learners with opportunities to apply skills in acquiring and using data. AGENDA: 8:30 Welcome, introductions, ESIP overview & distribute assembled drones to participants 9:00 Participant-led intros to safety and documentation (Use B4UFLY app* and fill out a pre-flight checklist) 9:15 Drone Aerodynamics 1: Goal: controlled flight and simple maneuvers. New pilots will be paired with experienced pilots. 10:00 ESIP Education sampler sessions (Three 10-minute talks with connections to drones) 10:30 Meeting-wide Break 11:00 Three more 10 minute talks 11:30 Drone Aerodynamics 2: Running simple investigations Model best practices for safety and documentation (always). UAV payloads and / or other activities for novices; Image gathering challenge for experienced folks. Share all suggested activity sheets and invite exploration, input, and feedback. 12:30 Lunch 1:30 Drone Aerodynamics 3: off-the-shelf and miniature DIY sensors Take your skills to the next level. Explore and imagine new activities. 3:00 Discuss the most effective way to help educators remain motivated and engaged. Assign responsibilities for testing activities. Develop consensus on best practices for activity instructions. Outline timeline and milestones for e-book. 4:40 Evaluations & wrap-up

Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Integrating ISO Metadata into HDF Data Products
Many communities are working to improve their data documentation through the use of ISO metadata standards. The HDF Group is working to facilitate the use of ISO in HDF. The HDF Product Designer (https://wiki.earthdata.nasa.gov/display/HPD/HDF+Product+Designer) helps users define metadata and file structures for data products in the Hierarchical Data Format. We will describe and demonstrate current Product Designer capabilities and explore approaches to integrating ISO metadata into product designs. Two NASA use cases will be presented.

Speakers

Tuesday July 19, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom A

9:00am

Harness: A New Development and Testing Environment for Big Data Algorithms
Harness is a generic environment designed to handle easy loading, parsing, and evaluation of complex software projects and project groups. Large-scale systems consisting of multiple languages and intricate computational routines can be loaded into Harness as components and parsed into internal and external functions that can in turn be combined into workflows to be evaluated both in execution metrics and workflow state. Evaluations with matching output types can be compared against each other for differences as projects evolve over time. Harness uses a generic style that exposes system components as web enabled microservices, making it a good candidate for modernizing and standardizing all sorts of code bases. Harness was developed in concert with a reengineering effort of the pairwise homogeneity algorithm at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, North Carolina, and is a perfect match for the complex climate data domain. This will be a general overview of the concept of the open source Harness software system, examining its tenets and potential utility in Big Climate Data. We plan on having the engineers who worked on the pairwise homogeneity algorithm reengineering available to discuss a real world application of the system. We are also hoping to hear feedback and features that would be most useful in future development, to see where the project should focus its development resources. For more information and a more detailed look, the white paper on the project is available.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Berkheimer

Ryan Berkheimer

Software Research, GST at NOAA NCEI


Tuesday July 19, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom B

9:00am

Deep Insights - Search Analytics for the Domain Sciences
Much of the data in within the domain sciences is textual in nature. Let that sink in. It's certainly something that with the wealth of remotely sensed, airborne and spaceborne, and in-situ scientific measurements that a casual user wouldn't expect, but it's precisely the case. Take the polar data repository Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) as a prime example - 50% of its data is text-based and not stored in scientific binary data files. The thing about text - there's a lot of meaning that can derived from automatically extracting and processing text. Persons, names, organizations, locations, dates, all of the types of features that are extremely useful in answering questions such as What are the impacts of Atmospheric Carbon per year as the relate to the Polar Sciences or show a trend of mentions of Oil Spills in the Arctic Regions? Through funding from the NSF, DARPA and NASA we have created a set of Polar Deep Insights that are information-retrieval and machine learning-based extractions from textual and scientific information in the Polar and Cryospheric sciences domain that answer grand challenge questions such as those above.The extracted information is made available and interactive using the Data-Driven Documents (D3) framework and in our Polar Deep Insights we demonstrate that we can answer grand challenge questions from the President's Strategy for the Arctic Region examples of which were previously mentioned above. In this session we will demonstrate our system, http://polar.usc.edu/ and invite the community to contribute to prioritizing what types of questions we should be focusing on.

Speakers

Tuesday July 19, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom C

9:00am

AGU Data Management Maturity (DMM) Workshop
The AGU Data Management Maturity (DMM) Workshop is an opportunity to learn more about the process areas included in the DMM reference model as it applies to the Earth and space sciences. We will discuss important process inter-dependencies, and how to characterize the level of data management capability for your organization. You will learn about common data management weaknesses and specific steps you can take to improve your own data management practices as soon as you get home. This is a great workshop for any data curation team, repository of any size, or anyone working with data.

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director of Data Leadership at the American Geophysical Union. Shelley has more than two decades of experience working in high-volume, complex data management environments. She has helped organizations in not-for-profit, commercial, defense, and federal... Read More →


Tuesday July 19, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom D

9:00am

Software Evaluation Guidelines Workshop: Part 1
Come help ESIP develop software assessment guidelines for describing code maturity, project maturity and sustainability for research code and software. Our goal is to provide support and guidance to a broad range of stakeholders creating code products and to define, as a community, what aspects are important to promote for research groups and for the research community. In this first session, we'll be discussing the guideline revisions to date (available for comment) with a focus on containerization (during development, reusability, and preservation/archiving), interoperability and areas that are missing or lacking consensus. We encourage you to take a look at the draft before the session and to set up an Hypothes.is account for making contributions/comments during the session. This is a half day working session with the second session described here.

Speakers
SS

Soren Scott

The Ronin Institute


Tuesday July 19, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Meeting Room 1 & 2

11:00am

Educator's Workshop: Testing & Polishing STEM Activities for Recreational Drones
15 educators selected through our application process will test and refine a range of activity ideas. Participants will make plans for facilitating STEM learning using recreational drones in clubs, classrooms, and for science fair activities. Participants will also learn of ESIP projects and learning activities that give learners a chance to apply skills in finding and using data. DRAFT AGENDA: 8:30am - Welcome, introductions, ESIP overview & distribute assembled drones to participants 9:00am - Safety concerns and Best Practices for documenting Drone Data (review of webinar content revised & updated) 9:30am - Flight school session 1 - UAV payloads / Activity 2 / Activity 3 (Three concurrent activities. Participants will be grouped according to flight experience) 10:00am - Break 10:30 - ESIP Education sampler sessions (~10 minutes each - connections to drones as possible) 11:20 - 12:00 - Lunch (NOTE: ESIP members who make 10-minute talks will be available the last 1/2 hour of lunch) 1:30 - Flight school session 2 3:00 - Break 3:30 - Brainstorm activities for e-book 4:40 - Evaluations & wrap-up

Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Grand Ballroom

11:00am

HDF in the Cloud
The HDF Group is working with a number of partners to define practical approaches to storing and accessing HDF data in the cloud. We will describe the current status of this work and demonstrate tools that facilitate it.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Powers

Lindsay Powers

Deputy Director of Earth Sciences, The HDF Group
Community development, Metadata, Integrative Earth Science, fly fishing, paddling, food


Tuesday July 19, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

11:00am

SciSpark 101: Introduction to Spark
We introduce a 3 part course module on SciSpark, our AIST14 funded project for Highly Interactive and Scalable Climate Model Metrics and Analytics. The three part course session includes 101, 201, and 301 classes for learning how to use Spark for science.


SciSpark 101 is a 1.5 hour session in which we will use SciSpark to introduce the fundamental concepts required to develop new programs and convert existing programs to take advantage of Spark. This will include an overview of Apache Zeppelin, Spark, andHadoop and also cover the concepts of filter, map, reduce, collect, and counter. We will work within the SciSpark environment using both Scala and Python as a functional programming language.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

11:00am

Data Management Training (DMT) Working Group Update: Clearinghouse Project, Role-Based Data Management Topic Development, and the Next Installment of the Training Modules
During this session, the Data Management Training (DMT) Working Group (under the auspices of the ESIP Data Stewardship Committee) will share the current status of the following projects and invites anyone interested to get involved. Clearinghouse Project: The Data Management Clearinghouse project proposal was submitted in October 2015 in response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Community for Data Integration (CDI). CDI awarded funds to the Clearinghouse project for work between June 1st and September 30th, 2016. The Clearinghouse project is focusing efforts on collecting and annotating learning resources and, eventually, training events related to data management for Earth sciences. At the session, the DMT Working Group will demonstrate the web interface to the DMT Clearinghouse which is designed to include search & discovery of learning resources on data management training, a submission form for crowd-sourced additions to the Clearinghouse and an administrative view that will allow reviewers & editors of the Clearinghouse to add or correct any metadata not included at the time of submission for quality control purposes. We will be soliciting feedback on the web interface and functionality of the metadata input forms and the content management system that is being implemented on the ESIP Commons for the Clearinghouse project. Role-Based Data Management Training Topic Development: As part of the development for the Clearinghouse project and the next data management training modules, the DMT Working Group has approached the task of topic development from the point of view of the information needs of different types of people involved with data management, such as data producers, data managers, and data librarians. Consequently, the DMT Working Group is working to understand the categories of users that should be included within the above projects and determine how the content of the Clearinghouse and the training modules could be structured to support the needs. Next Installment of the Training Modules: The current versions of the modules within the "ESIP Data Management for Scientists Short Course" were originally created and published between 2011 and 2013. While the extant 35 modules still provide valuable training information for their respective topics, the DMT Working Group is interested in producing the next set of training modules to address the current and emerging data management training areas. During the session, the DMT Working Group would like to discuss the topics, format and process of creating and/or updating learning resources that have been suggested for the next installment of the training modules, and solicit additional topic suggestions, marketing strategies, and funding opportunities for the next edition. The DMT Working Group's wiki and listserv can be accessed using the following links: Data Management Trainning Wiki: http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Data_Management_Training Data Management Training Listserv: http://lists.esipfed.org/mailman/listinfo/esip_dmtraining

Speakers
SH

Sophie Hou

Data Curation and Stewardship Coordinator, National Center for Atmospheric Research
data management/curation/stewardship: including but not limited to data life cycle, policies, sustainability, education and training, data quality, usability.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

11:00am

Software Evaluation Guidelines Workshop: Part 2
Come help ESIP develop software assessment guidelines for describing code maturity, project maturity and sustainability for research code and software. Our goal is to provide support and guidance to a broad range of stakeholders creating code products and to define, as a community, what aspects are important to promote for research groups and for the research community. In this session, we'll be discussing how the developed guidelines (from our first session) can be used to define progressions for code and project maturity. Can we define happy paths for certain activities that provide benefits for both researcher and community? How can we support code/software projects provided for reproducibility/preservation only vs those intended for reuse by the community? Draft guidelines We encourage you to take a look at the draft before the session and to set up an Hypothes.is account for making contributions/comments during the session.

Speakers
SS

Soren Scott

The Ronin Institute


Tuesday July 19, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

12:30pm

Brownbag Lunch: Open Science Framework Demonstration (1:00pm)
This practical workshop will highlight research workflow practices to improve reproducibility. Topics include connecting common workflows and eliminating data silos, sharing and managing collaborations, and getting the most out of the Open Science Framework (http://osf.io/) for private and public projects.


Speakers
MS

Matt Spitzer

Community Manager, Center for Open Science


Tuesday July 19, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

12:30pm

Brownbag Lunch: How to talk about ESIP to non-ESIPers (1:00pm)
Informal gathering to learn how to reach-in to your organization to talk about ESIP. 

Speakers
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP


Tuesday July 19, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Meeting Room 3 & 4

2:00pm

Educator's Workshop: Testing & Polishing STEM Activities for Recreational Drones
15 educators selected through our application process will test and refine a range of activity ideas. Participants will make plans for facilitating STEM learning using recreational drones in clubs, classrooms, and for science fair activities. Participants will also learn of ESIP projects and learning activities that give learners a chance to apply skills in finding and using data. DRAFT AGENDA: 8:30am - Welcome, introductions, ESIP overview & distribute assembled drones to participants 9:00am - Safety concerns and Best Practices for documenting Drone Data (review of webinar content revised & updated) 9:30am - Flight school session 1 - UAV payloads / Activity 2 / Activity 3 (Three concurrent activities. Participants will be grouped according to flight experience) 10:00am - Break 10:30 - ESIP Education sampler sessions (~10 minutes each - connections to drones as possible) 11:20 - 12:00 - Lunch (NOTE: ESIP members who make 10-minute talks will be available the last 1/2 hour of lunch) 1:30 - Flight school session 2 3:00 - Break 3:30 - Brainstorm activities for e-book 4:40 - Evaluations & wrap-up

Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

HDF Communities
The Hierarchical Data Format is used in many Earth Science communities as well as many other disciplines, and these communities have a lot to learn from each other. This session will expose a few diverse HDF users, and how they are working with the technology. The focus here is to create discussion across disciplines to expose common challenges and solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Powers

Lindsay Powers

Deputy Director of Earth Sciences, The HDF Group
Community development, Metadata, Integrative Earth Science, fly fishing, paddling, food


Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

2:00pm

SciSpark 201: Searching for MCCs
We introduce a 3 part course module on SciSpark, our AIST14 funded project for Highly Interactive and Scalable Climate Model Metrics and Analytics. The three part course session includes 101, 201, and 301 classes for learning how to use Spark for science.

SciSpark 201 is a 1.5 hour session in which we will use the search for Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) in Satellite Infrared data to show a real world example of how SciSpark enables real time response to both search queries and modifications to the underlying code. This task is representative of the motivation behind SciSpark -  iterative data-reuse algorithms that share information between multiple stages.




Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

2:00pm

Reference Frameworks for Assessing Maturity of Earth Science Data Products: Part 1
When managing and providing effective stewardship to digital Earth Science data products in the era of Big Data and Open Data, reference frameworks for assessing dataset quality are key components in helping with the major challenges of consistently describing and systematically integrating quality information to diverse audiences of data users. The natural evolution of user base and data tools over time require continuous monitoring and flexible--but consistent--methods of rating and signaling data quality and maturity. This workshop consists of two sessions. The first session will bring together a panel of experts in the fields of exploring quantifiable measurements of product, stewardship, and service maturity levels for digital data in order to help data managers, data producers, or institutions to identify the strength and gaps in their procedures or practices applied to individual data products.The panel will examine the current states of the cutting-edge research, following by Q&A and panel discussion. The second session (http://commons.esipfed.org/node/9035) will provide updates on use case studies of various maturity assessment models, followed by training/working time for attendees to get familiar with and apply the assessment models, including the data stewardship maturity model, to their datasets. Inivited Panelists & Presentation Focus Areas John Bates, NOAA/NCEI - Reference Framework for Product Maturity Assessment Anna Privette, Climate Data Solution & NASA - Relevance of maturity identification to enhance the usability of the federal data Michael Brewer and Derek Arndt, NOAA/NCEI - Assessing Service Maturity through End User Engagement and Climate Monitoring Grace Peng, NCAR - Conveying data quality and suitability to diverse audiences of data users.

Speakers
SH

Sophie Hou

Data Curation and Stewardship Coordinator, National Center for Atmospheric Research
data management/curation/stewardship: including but not limited to data life cycle, policies, sustainability, education and training, data quality, usability.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

2:00pm

Building Semantic and Syntactic Interoperability Into EnviroSensing Systems: Part 1
The ESIP EnviroSensing Collaboration Area was organized around the need to create resource guides and share deployment strategies for real-time sensor networks. The NSF EarthCube Integrative Activity called the X-DOMES (Cross-Domain Metadata EnviroSensing) Network is actively building tools and seeks to develop a community of stakeholders within the ESIP community to foster sensor metadata best practices that result in the creation of machine-harvestable, standards-based descriptions of how an observation came to be. The first half of the workshop is intended to guide participants in the creation of sensor-related vocabularies that include observable properties, sensing technologies, observational parameters and processing methods as spreadsheets and then to assist them in the registery of the content using the newly implemented ESIP-COR (Community Ontology Registry) or a registry within their domain, such as the MMI-ORR (Marine Metadata Interoperability - Ontology Registry & Repository). This will provide a resolvable resource (URLS) for each term which can be used in annotating web services (such as OGC-SWE SOS). The second half of the session enables participants to develop SensorML profiles for sensors within their domain, referencing the registered terms. This exercise prefaces X-DOMES planned work to engage sensor manufacturers to build machine-harvestable sensor descriptions, which will be also be registered so the content can be resolvable, discoverable and persist within the ESIP Enviro-Sensing community. As the participants assess the SensorML Editor/Viewer, we will develop a cross-domain approach that engages sensor manufacturers and sensor field operators. The main goal is to capture knowledge where it is best understood and provide the capability to fully-describe content to enable data quality assessment and automated quality control.

Speakers
avatar for Felimon Gayanilo

Felimon Gayanilo

System Architect/Enterprise IT, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi


Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

2:00pm

Lightning Talk Practice
Tuesday July 19, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Meeting Room 3 & 4

4:00pm

Educator's Workshop: Testing & Polishing STEM Activities for Recreational Drones
15 educators selected through our application process will test and refine a range of activity ideas. Participants will make plans for facilitating STEM learning using recreational drones in clubs, classrooms, and for science fair activities. Participants will also learn of ESIP projects and learning activities that give learners a chance to apply skills in finding and using data. DRAFT AGENDA: 8:30am - Welcome, introductions, ESIP overview & distribute assembled drones to participants 9:00am - Safety concerns and Best Practices for documenting Drone Data (review of webinar content revised & updated) 9:30am - Flight school session 1 - UAV payloads / Activity 2 / Activity 3 (Three concurrent activities. Participants will be grouped according to flight experience) 10:00am - Break 10:30 - ESIP Education sampler sessions (~10 minutes each - connections to drones as possible) 11:20 - 12:00 - Lunch (NOTE: ESIP members who make 10-minute talks will be available the last 1/2 hour of lunch) 1:30 - Flight school session 2 3:00 - Break 3:30 - Brainstorm activities for e-book 4:40 - Evaluations & wrap-up

Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom

4:00pm

HDF Town Hall
The HDF Group has a new CEO, David Pearah, and we are taking this opportunity to introduce him to the ESIP Community. Please come meet Dave and hear about his vision for HDF. This is also an opportunity for the ESIP community to learn about new developments in HDF and contribute to future direections. We will describe and discuss new capabilities and tools that have been developed recently and/or are being added in the new version of HDF being released this year (HDF 1.10.1).

Speakers

Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

4:00pm

SciSpark 301: Build Your Own Climate Metrics
We introduce a 3 part course module on SciSpark, our AIST14 funded project for Highly Interactive and Scalable Climate Model Metrics and Analytics. The three part course session includes 101, 201, and 301 classes for learning how to use Spark for science.

SciSpark 301 is a 1.5 hr course in which we will provide lessons learned from our experience in SciSpark as well as a selection of notebooks for attendees to explore, learn from, expand on, and venture out on their own. This session is intended for individuals who have a desire to play with SciSpark and investigate its possible uses in their own work. We plan to have notebooks prepared that show use of a K-means clustering algorithm for identification of Probability Density Functions for climate extremes, the Open Climate WorkBench, and the Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer. This session will include ample time for more in-depth discussion and problem-solving of attendees’ interests.



  • P. C. Loikith, J. Kim, H. Lee, B. Linter, C. Mattmann, J. J. D. Neelin, D. E. Waliser, L. Mearns, S. McGinnis. Evaluation of Surface Temperature Probability Distribution Functions in the NARCCAP Hindcast Experiment. Journal of Climate, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 978-997, February 2015. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00457.1.

  • Lee, Seungwon, et al. "Climate model diagnostic analyzer." Big Data (Big Data), 2015 IEEE International Conference on. IEEE, 2015.



Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

4:00pm

Reference Frameworks for Assessing Maturity of Earth Science Data Products: Part 2
When managing and providing effective stewardship to digital Earth Science data products in the era of Big Data and Open Data, reference frameworks for assessing dataset quality are key components in helping with the major challenges of consistently describing and systematically integrating quality information to diverse audiences of data users. The natural evolution of user base and data tools over time require continuous monitoring and flexible--but consistent--methods of rating and signaling data quality and maturity. This workshop consists of two sessions. The first session ( (http://commons.esipfed.org/node/9036) will bring together a panel of experts in the fields of exploring quantifiably measurements of product, stewardship, and service maturity levels for digital data in order to help data managers, data producers, or institutions to identify the strength and gaps in their procedures or practices applied to individual data products.They will examine the current states of the cutting-edge research, following by Q&A and panel discussion. The second session will provide updates on use case studies of various maturity assessment models. It follows by training/working time for attendees to get familiar with and apply the assessment models, including the data stewardship maturity model, to their datasets. Use case study update presentation focus areas Shelley Stall - AGU Data Management Assessment Program using the Data Management Maturity framework use case study Sophie Hou and Ruth Duerr - ESIP DSMM use case study Nancy Ritchey and Ge Peng - NCEI DSMM use case study AGU's Data Management Assessment Program Use Case Study AGU conducted two assessments as part of the introduction and piloting of the Data Management Maturity (DMM) framework. Each organization assessed has different data management objectives in support of their organization's strategic goals. We'll discuss the flexibility of the DMM Framework, the assessment approach used for each organization, and the results of each assessment. Pilot #1: USGS ScienceBase Repository - Data Release Team Pilot #2: The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) Team The purposes of the ESIP Data Stewardship Maturity Matrix (DSMM) Use Case Study Evaluate and improve DSMM and generalize its across-disciplines application Evaluate and improve the DSMM self-assessment template Develop community-wide dataset-centric stewardship requirements and guidance The purposes of the NCEI Data Stewardship Maturity Matrix (DSMM) Use Case Study Demonstrate the utility of DSMM, ensure and improve consistency of its application to various NCEI data types Establish baselines for high-utility/impact NCEI core datasets Explore requirements for collecting and capturing content-rich quality metadata

Speakers
SH

Sophie Hou

Data Curation and Stewardship Coordinator, National Center for Atmospheric Research
data management/curation/stewardship: including but not limited to data life cycle, policies, sustainability, education and training, data quality, usability.


Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

4:00pm

Building Semantic and Syntactic Interoperability Into EnviroSensing Systems: Part 2
The ESIP EnviroSensing Collaboration Area was organized around the need to create resource guides and share deployment strategies for real-time sensor networks. The NSF EarthCube Integrative Activity called the X-DOMES (Cross-Domain Metadata EnviroSensing) Network is actively building tools and seeks to develop a community of stakeholders within the ESIP community to foster sensor metadata best practices that result in the creation of machine-harvestable, standards-based descriptions of how an observation came to be. The first half of the workshop is intended to guide participants in the creation of sensor-related vocabularies that include observable properties, sensing technologies, observational parameters and processing methods as spreadsheets and then to assist them in the registery of the content using the newly implemented ESIP-COR (Community Ontology Registry) or a registry within their domain, such as the MMI-ORR (Marine Metadata Interoperability - Ontology Registry & Repository). This will provide a resolvable resource (URLS) for each term which can be used in annotating web services (such as OGC-SWE SOS). The second half of the session enables participants to develop SensorML profiles for sensors within their domain, referencing the registered terms. This exercise prefaces X-DOMES planned work to engage sensor manufacturers to build machine-harvestable sensor descriptions, which will be also be registered so the content can be resolvable, discoverable and persist within the ESIP Enviro-Sensing community. As the participants assess the SensorML Editor/Viewer, we will develop a cross-domain approach that engages sensor manufacturers and sensor field operators. The main goal is to capture knowledge where it is best understood and provide the capability to fully-describe content to enable data quality assessment and automated quality control. Notes: This workshop relates to activities being planned by Tom Narock and the Semantic Web Committee.

Speakers
avatar for Felimon Gayanilo

Felimon Gayanilo

System Architect/Enterprise IT, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi


Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

4:00pm

Lightning Talk Practice
Tuesday July 19, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Meeting Room 3 & 4

6:00pm

Drones Field Trip
Limited Capacity filling up

The Drone Field Trip is upon us! 

Looking at the weather forecast, it is supposed to be quite hot and possibly rainy in the afternoon. We are hoping that all will go forward as planned, but please do keep in mind that this will be a weather dependent event. 

Current Drone Field Trip Plan:

Today (Tuesday):The final ESIP Session is at 5:30pm, which which will give you just enough time to grab: sunglasses, hat, outdoor adventure clothing, rain gear before:

5:50pm -- Meet at the Marriott LobbyWe will discuss Logistics, Mission Overview and Pre-Mission Planning in the Lobby for 5-10 minutes.
6:00pm -- Climb on board the various rental vans / cars.We will drive about 20 minutes away. 
6:30pm-7:15pm -- Watch Mission Planning and Drone Flight Unfortunately, Drone Operator Maxwell Messinger will not be able to join us. However we have on hand Student Fellow Sean Barberie, recently returned from Drone Mission in New Zealand. We'll help plan the mission, watch as the Phantom3 collects imagery, and talk about ground truthing and auxiliary ground data collection.
7:30-8:00pm -- Return to Hotel. We're hoping to be back by 7:30pm, but please plan accordingly. 

Hope to see you all soon,
- Lindsay Barbieri (email me at lkbar@uvm.edu with questions)


Speakers

7:30pm

Jam Session
Come and play (or listen) as musical ESIP members convene in The Vault.

Tuesday July 19, 2016 7:30pm - 11:00pm
Other: The Blue Note Grill 709 Washington St, Durham, NC 27701
 
Wednesday, July 20
 

8:00am

Plenary Welcome
Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 8:00am - 8:30am
Grand Ballroom

8:30am

Raskin Scholar Talk
Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Plenary Talks

Wednesday July 20, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Grand Ballroom

11:00am

Researchers and scientists love data management. Huh?
There is general agreement that managing your research data is important. There is good support for post docs or curation teams putting in the time to prepare the data for the repository. But, it’s not a common belief that everyone has a role to play in data management starting with the researcher. How can we change the value we place on data management. How can we embrace the importance of data management practices throughout the lifecycle. How can we convince our research community to love data management?  

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director of Data Leadership at the American Geophysical Union. Shelley has more than two decades of experience working in high-volume, complex data management environments. She has helped organizations in not-for-profit, commercial, defense, and federal... Read More →


Wednesday July 20, 2016 11:00am - 11:08am
Grand Ballroom

11:12am

The Biogeographic Information System: experimentation in a new way of organizing and publishing scientific findings
The communication of scientific ideas and discoveries has not kept pace with the overall flow of information across the planet that we seek to better understand, and it is not moving fast enough to address the full breadth of the challenges facing our societies and our environment. On the other hand, we have entered an age where nearly all scientific thought and the execution of our experiments and trials can be encoded in software, opened for broad scrutiny, and accelerate our ability to make new discoveries. In the USGS, we are experimenting with a new method of organizing data, information, and knowledge toward a real time, iterative National Biodiversity Assessment. We borrowed heavily on the ideas and methods for traceability and transparency from the Global Change Information System developed by the US Global Change Research Program but are taking our Biogeographic Information System a few steps further to incorporate live data services and working scientific software. We are building on the idea of flexible Synthesis Compositions that assemble Analysis Packages to communicate scientific findings in multimodal ways from traditional GIS maps and reports to story maps and dynamic web presentations. We are testing ideas for how peer review and agency approvals work in an environment where data and software are the primary products of the scientific process and prose descriptions of scientific findings are parsed down to their simplest essence to explain to humans what is evident in the execution of software algorithms.

Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 11:12am - 11:20am
Grand Ballroom

11:24am

Where'd I see that data management training session again? Aha! It was on the ESIP DMT Clearinghouse!
So, you’re an early career scientist, or maybe a data manager who’s tired of explaining WHY metadata is important, or a data curator who needs to know how to convert this brand-smackin’ new format into the more tried & true format required by your data repository – doesn’t matter who you are, you need some training about data management related issues!! How do you go about finding the training information you need quickly? Thanks to seed funding from the USGS Community for Data Integration, a Data Management Training working group under the ESIP Data Stewardship Committee is in the process of creating & implementing a moderated, crowd-sourced Clearinghouse. The descriptions within the Clearinghouse for the data management training materials will reside on the ESIP Commons and made widely discoverable through Internet search engines such as Google and Yahoo. This session will demonstrate how anyone with knowledge about data management training resources or events can input brief descriptive information about them, and also search for other resources or events. This brief demo is a preview for a longer breakout session in which we will provide more background, and invite you to give feedback on the interface and functionality of the fledgling resource.  


Wednesday July 20, 2016 11:24am - 11:29am
Grand Ballroom

11:33am

Search Relevancy 101
Big Data means more than just Volume; it can also show up as Big Variety. There are so many science datasets available, that searching for and finding the right one is becoming harder every day. One solution is to return search results with the most relevant ones at the top. Why so difficult? Well, dataset relevancy is a little different than the ordinary relevancy rankings one would use for web pages. Dataset versioning, temporal overlap, spatial overlap, download frequency are all potential means of presenting the datasets most likely to be useful to a user.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, ESDIS


Wednesday July 20, 2016 11:33am - 11:41am
Grand Ballroom

11:51am

From Big Data to Better Decisions: How Weather Information is Making People Safer and Businesses Smarter
Each day, The Weather Company serves users in every country in the world, with forecast data for 2.2 Billion locations, to help them make decisions about their day, and provide government weather alerts for 34+ countries to provide actionable severe weather warnings to citizens.

Thousands of businesses, from aviation and insurance, to grocery stores and major retailers, rely on The Weather Company's services to plan and adjust based on how weather may affect their business and how to in turn, support their customers.

With a growing daily ingest of 100+ Terabytes of data like pollen, turbulence, radar, satellite imagery, traffic, personal weather stations, cars, and smartphone pressure data, The Weather Company helps citizens, businesses, and governments plan before, during, and after significant events to keep people and property safer and help companies understand the impact of weather on their business and take action.

Speakers
JG

Jason Geer

The Weather Company


Wednesday July 20, 2016 11:51am - 11:59am
Grand Ballroom

12:03pm

Learning to Sci-Comm: a Story about Experiencing a Dataset

What do a campus tour, a learning-robot, and a subtle murder plot have in common? They are all aspects of this lighthearted tale about a researcher's (nine-minute) journey to increasingly improve how data is communicated.

Details: Tripp Corbett, Christine White, and Sudhir Shrestha (and possibly other willing victims) will show – through an interactive multi-media tale - how to create a story map to share a message and its supporting research with a target community or the public. They will also attempt to stretch the boundaries on what it means to truly understand a dataset. For what we may lack in theatrics, we will make up in good mapping!

 


Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 12:03pm - 12:11pm
Grand Ballroom

12:15pm

The Use of Jupyter Notebooks to Bridge the Gap between Users and Web Services
The Jupyter Notebook environment has become an excellent platform for presenting the utility of LP DAAC web services for a number of reasons. Jupyter notebooks are great for demonstrating real world science use cases; giving a step-by-step account of the data, processes, and services used in a scientific workflows. Notebooks can also bridge the gap between users and their knowledge of web services by providing recipes for web service execution. Finally, Jupyter notebooks not only provide the functionality to create beautiful and informative recipes with narratives that provide context, but also can be easily shared through a variety of mechanisms.

Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 12:15pm - 12:20pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

Describing the repository landscape for data curators
We have many repositories in scientific domains for natural and social science research data, and an increasing expectation that primary research data will be deposited there. Data centers and repositories offer a variety services to researchers for this purpose, and a growing community of data managers and curators act as liaisons between primary researchers and repositories. To understand how to work with repositories, data managers need to know their basic features. Several groups have embarked on a discussion of the landscape of repositories and their services, eg, the Research Data Alliance (RDA), the Council of Data Facilities (CDF), and at a recent workshop focused on planning collaborative efforts among repositories in Tempe, AZ, that culminated in an ESIP cluster (Sustainable Data Management). This session will continue the discussion. We will become familiar with the existing and planned material describing repositories (e.g., from RDA, CDF, re3data.org), and assemble questions asked by curators and researchers when deciding which repositories to contribute to, and how to work with them.

Speakers
avatar for USDA National Agricultural Library

USDA National Agricultural Library

National Agricultural Library
USDA National Agricultural Library (NAL) | | Demonstrate NAL's open data projects with GODAN community and other attendees. Exhibit highlights new open platforms, technology, and data products that are important for the scientific research community and in alignment with US federal... Read More →
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara


Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

The Users' Perspective: How are Energy Utilities and Developers Using Earth Observation Data to Address Climate Resilience and Support Renewable Energy?
Energy utilities and power project developers are increasingly recognizing the climate-sensitivity of their day-to-day operations and planning on the 20-30 year timescale. Solar and wind power project developers require resource data and forecasts for project design, operations, and financing. Increasingly sophisticated software and models from value-added providers and in-house meteorology groups at some utilities rely on Earth observations from NASA, NOAA, and other sources to support their decisions. Hear from energy sector end users on their current and emerging decision-support needs focused on a climate resilient infrastructure and renewable energy development. A summary of a recent NASA-sponsored workshop on this topic will provide context for the panel discussion.


Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

2:00pm

Climate Literacy Collective Impact - Developing a Strategy
In recent years there have been a plethora of climate and energy literacy efforts, government funded and community based to enable individuals, professionals, organizations, and governments to make effective decisions within their realms of responsibility. Individually these efforts have limited reach, impact, and duration. We are seeking to enable broader reach, impact and sustainability through the development of effective Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort framed on the collective impact model described by Kania and Kramer (2011). In this Working Session we will build on input the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) has received through ongoing discussions and surveys. This input suggests an effective strategy for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort is to enable a network of networks. The specific focus of the session will be to develop a template for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact Network at the regional/metropolitan scale and how it might fit into a coordinating overarching network that would coordinate and leverage the regional/metropolitan networks across the country. Resources Google Doc summarizing input received from multiple professional meeting opportunities (Dec 2012-Feb 2014) at http://tinyurl.com/Summaryofmgwndtr) Results from 2013 CLEAN Network Survey (published in the Journal of Geoscience Education http://dx.doi.org/10.5408/13-057.1) AGU 2015 Workshop - Increasing Climate Literacy Through Collective Impact, Breakout group discussions http://tinyurl.com/jmrf42c Kania and Kramer, Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 9(1), 36-41, http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact), 2011. Actions This will be a Working Session. There will be invited participants who will be addressing developing a template for building a regional/metropolitan area climate literacy collective impact effort. We need a full day of breakout sessions. I think they are 1.5 hours each and there are 4 in a day. The 4 can be broken over two days if the plenary sessions require that. While we will have invited participants attendees of the ESIP Federation meeting are welcome to participate in the discussions. Ledley needs to leave in the afternoon of Thursday July 21 to particpate in the Earth Educators Rendezvous in Wisconsin so these session must be complete by then.

Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

2:00pm

ESIP Testbed Governance: Readiness Levels and Reuse
Join us to discuss the future of ESIP's testbed. This session kicks off a potential evolution in the testbed governance as we grow beyond Products & Services with the new Semantic Tech committee offerings. We will be discussing the spin-up of a Testbed governance cluster to manage proposal review panels and provide a model for cross-cluster/committee collaborations, starting with a structure to support the progression of projects through the testbed from the P&S incubator through SemTech (or P&S) prototype projects. What model should ESIP use to define readiness levels in these cases? How should that be assessed (related: ESIP's Software Assessment activities)? We would also like to consider ways that the testbed can evolve to support different kinds of projects or opportunities for ESIP members.

Speakers
SS

Soren Scott

The Ronin Institute


Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

2:00pm

Challenges and Progress in Search Relevancy
As dataset diversity and data volumes continue to increase, providing users with the interfaces, tools and services they need to discover relevant datasets creates new challenges and opportunities for the improvement of search relevancy and search engine result ranking. Diversity of user communities is a challenge as well, given that relevancy depends on specific user types and needs. In this session we will report on projects and activities to improve search relevancy from the perspective of finding and utilizing Earth science in-situ, satellite and model data. We will explore search relevance on both the dataset and granule levels, dataset relationships/dependencies, semantic relationships, data quality, user characterization and content based ranking. Specifically we will report on search relevance activities and results ongoing in NASA, NCAR and other organizations with the goal of building synergy among community experiences, and developing strategies to improve search relevance and user experience across the entire spectrum of Earth science data and data users. PRESENTATIONS: 1) NASA Progress in Search Relevancy Edward M. Armstrong, Lewis McGibbney, Kim Whitehall NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Recently the NASA ESDSWG on Search Relevance concluded its first year of activities to address search relevance across the 12 NASA earth science data centers. It was originally proposed to characterize the term search relevancy as it relates to ESDIS, to assess the implementations that address search relevancy, and to determine how existing implementations can be improved and new approaches be enacted. Individually and collectively, the group sought the expertise of persons within ESDIS, industry and academia. Five core subgroups (from an initial collection of ten) were organized on the topics of Spatial Relevance, Temporal Relevance, Dataset Heuristics, Dataset Relationships, and Federated Search: Spatial relevance; This subgroup aimed to provide direction on substantiated metrics on methods to define spatial overlap in searches with the purpose to improve relevance ranking based on dataset spatial characteristics. Temporal relevance; This subgroup aimed to provide direction on substantiated metrics on methods to define temporal overlap in searches with the purpose to improve relevance ranking based on dataset temporal characteristics. Dataset relevance heuristics; This subgroup aimed to identify the top heuristics in Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and other search engines and applicability to EOSDIS and DAACs, with the purpose of taking a first pass at the dataset (collection) search problem. Dataset relationships; This subgroup aimed to provide a common framework for identifying relatedness across datasets with the purpose of lowering the barrier to obtaining similar datasets for a given user query. Implementation in Federated Search; This subgroup aimed to provide substantiated metrics and guidance on improving Information Retrieval (IR) practices within a Federated Search (FS) context defined as an IR technology that allows the simultaneous search of multiple searchable resources In this presentation we will summarize the findings and recommendations of the first year of the group activities as well as discuss our plans and progress for year 2 activities including addressing semantic dataset relationships, granule level relevance. mining user behavior, and optimizing content for commercial search engines. 2) Challenges and Potential Approach in Search Relevance from a Dataset Maturity Perspective Ge Peng NOAA CICS-NC/NCEI 3) Connecting diverse data users with diverse data sets at the NCAR Research Data Archive Grace Peng NCAR For more than 40 years, the RDA (rda.ucar.edu) has been collecting and disseminating weather and climate data to the research community. We host a growing collection of over 600 datasets from myriad sources, from ocean observations in 1662 to present day satellite measurements and globally gridded analyses/reanalyses. From inception, RDA data users have ranged from neophyte graduate student through professors with decades of experience. Increasingly, researchers from outside the weather and climate community (energy, insurance, government sectors) are using our data. This is a sign of our success and maturity. However, diverse user backgrounds means that we can no longer assume a common lingua franca when describing our data. In order to help researchers sift through our datasets to find what they need, we collect granule-level metadata that powers the RDA search functions. Users may search with free text, or perform faceted searches to successively narrow down possible selections. Once they have identified datasets of interest, they are directed to data set homepages which enable them to examine the parameters available for each file and vertical level. The granule-level metadata also enables us to offer custom subsetting services for most data sets. Because we are a .edu and teaching is part of our mission, we do not aim to fully automate our data discovery and other services. Each dataset is assigned to a data specialist who serves multiple roles as a data curator engineer software developer subject matter expert and educator. When data users are unsure about some aspect of the data, we want to engage with them to help clear up their confusion. This helps raise the level of sophistication of the data users and our understanding of how to better describe and refactor data to improve future usability. In this presentation, I will demonstrate some of our data discovery and education capabilities. I will also give an overview of our manual and automated metadata collection processes, which enables our search functions. 4) Earthdata Search: The Relevance of Relevance Patrick Quinn NASA Earthdata Search is a web application which allows users to search, discover, visualize, refine, and access NASA and International/Interagency data about the Earth. As a client to the CMR, its catalog of collections grew 700% in the past year. This massive expansion brought relevancy to the forefront of the client's usability needs. In this talk, we discuss places where the influx of collections helped illuminate existing usability issues and how we have tackled or plan to tackle those challenges by improving relevance and metadata.

Speakers
avatar for Lewis John McGibbney

Lewis John McGibbney

Chair, ESIP Semantic Technologies Committee, NASA, JPL
My name is Lewis John McGibbney, I am currently a Data Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California where I work in Computer Science and Data Intensive Applications. I enjoy floating up and down the tide of technologies @ The Apache Software Foundation having... Read More →


Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

2:00pm

Introduction to Drupal 8
The newly released version of the Drupal content management framework is quickly generating excitement among the web community. Almost a complete rewrite of the underlying codebase, Drupal 8 teamed with existing, successful open source PHP projects such as Symfony and Twig, to deliver a framework for web authoring and development that focuses on the content authoring experience, improved performance, and data as a first-class citizen. Come learn how to build a website using Drupal 8 to communicate your data, and following the introduction, there will be a hands on session for absolute beginners where you will learn to build your own Drupal website from scratch.

Speakers
AK

Ajinkya Kulkarni

Research Programmer/Developer, UAH/GHRC
Education, Programmable Systems


Wednesday July 20, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

4:00pm

Applying Usability Practices & Principles to Data Archives/Repositories
This session aims to discuss the applicability of using User Interface (UI)/User Experience (UX) principles and techniques in evaluating the services offered by data archives/repositories. The session will provide an overview of usability principles and common usability evaluation techniques as well as the different areas in which these principles and techniques could be applied in a data archive/repository setting. The session will also have two guest speakers presenting the usability testing/experience from their respective institutions. Additionally, as an example and using "cognitive walkthrough" as the evaluation method, the session will report on the evaluation results of the data submission process from five different data archives/repositories with geoscience as the focused discipline. By sharing the types of usability issues that user might encounter during a data submission process and demonstrating the potential fixes, the session invites the attendees to discuss whether the application of usability evaluations could lower the barrier to data use, and subsequently, possibly increase user participation in the data archive/repository process. A key aim of the discussion is to show how UX analysis and design need not be burdensome and can yield immediate results. A sample of discussion questions is listed as follows: Are usability evaluations currently being applied at your data archive/repositories? If yes: What are the evaluation techniques used? What are the services areas that have been evaluated? What are the key lessons learned? If not: What are the reasons? What are some of the key motivators that could help in integrating usability tests with the evaluation of data archive/repositories' services? How can low-cost high-speed usability approaches be integrated into a design process? How can you perform 'usability triage' (focusing on important but easy to fix issues)? How can you demonstrate the benefits of improving usability?

Speakers
SH

Sophie Hou

Data Curation and Stewardship Coordinator, National Center for Atmospheric Research
data management/curation/stewardship: including but not limited to data life cycle, policies, sustainability, education and training, data quality, usability.


Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom

4:00pm

Exploring New Opportunities for Data Access at Scale with Drupal 8 and ElasticSearch
Drupal, an open-source web framework for collaboration and content management, has filled an important niche enabling data management teams to organize, curate and archive Earth science metadata then publish it in a variety of forms - for humans (HTML) and machines (RESTful Web Services, RDFa, RDF, JSON-LD). Whilst the current Drupal version (7) has been an effective solution - powering WHOI's Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) metadata portal, amongst others - the recently released Drupal 8 innovates significantly to make data access from Drupal via semantic search and web services easier to implement and scale. Meanwhile, ElasticSearch has emerged as a highly scalable RESTful data store with fast fulltext search and data analytics baked in. Bridging Drupal metadata documents to ElasticSearch is now feasible and opens up even wider avenues for data access at scale - coupling Drupal's flexible content models and UIs for data management teams, with high-availability real-time RESTful search and analytics from ElasticSearch. ElasticSearch is also a powerful tool for driving faceted browsing and geospatial search. This session will feature, firstly, a run-down of the new web services and semantic innovations in Drupal 8. In the second half, we'll introduce ElasticSearch and present a case study of its use by RPI for faceted browsing at the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO, see https://tw.rpi.edu/web/project/DCO-DS/Technology). We'll finish up by demonstrating how to integrate Drupal with Elasticsearch, based on work done for BCO-DMO by Blue Dot Lab. There will be ample time for Q&A and discussion of how these new technologies might be applied to further improve data access in the Earth Science community. Talks: Elasticsearch-powered Faceted Search in the Deep Carbon Observatory Data Portal Authors: - Stephan Zednik - Patrick West - Peter Fox

Speakers
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO @ WHOI
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies


Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

4:00pm

Climate Literacy Collective Impact - Developing a Strategy
In recent years there have been a plethora of climate and energy literacy efforts, government funded and community based to enable individuals, professionals, organizations, and governments to make effective decisions within their realms of responsibility. Individually these efforts have limited reach, impact, and duration. We are seeking to enable broader reach, impact and sustainability through the development of effective Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort framed on the collective impact model described by Kania and Kramer (2011). In this Working Session we will build on input the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) has received through ongoing discussions and surveys. This input suggests an effective strategy for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort is to enable a network of networks. The specific focus of the session will be to develop a template for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact Network at the regional/metropolitan scale and how it might fit into a coordinating overarching network that would coordinate and leverage the regional/metropolitan networks across the country. Resources Google Doc summarizing input received from multiple professional meeting opportunities (Dec 2012-Feb 2014) at http://tinyurl.com/Summaryofmgwndtr) Results from 2013 CLEAN Network Survey (published in the Journal of Geoscience Education http://dx.doi.org/10.5408/13-057.1) AGU 2015 Workshop - Increasing Climate Literacy Through Collective Impact, Breakout group discussions http://tinyurl.com/jmrf42c Kania and Kramer, Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 9(1), 36-41, http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact), 2011. Actions This will be a Working Session. There will be invited participants who will be addressing developing a template for building a regional/metropolitan area climate literacy collective impact effort. We need a full day of breakout sessions. I think they are 1.5 hours each and there are 4 in a day. The 4 can be broken over two days if the plenary sessions require that. While we will have invited participants attendees of the ESIP Federation meeting are welcome to participate in the discussions. Ledley needs to leave in the afternoon of Thursday July 21 to particpate in the Earth Educators Rendezvous in Wisconsin so these session must be complete by then.

Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

4:00pm

Testbed Reports Out
This break out session is to invite several testbed to report their latest findings from different angles of supporting the Earth Science Informatics and includes: a) NSF funded EarthCube Integration and Testbed (ECITE) led by Sara Graves, Emily Law, Phil Yang, and Ken Keiser; b) a data container study funded by Mike Little/NASA AIST and led by Chris Lynnes; c) a semantic cloud testbed manged by STC (Tom Narock) and conducted as a collaboration between the NSF spatiotemporal innovation center, ESIP STC, ESIP CC, and ECITE.


Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

4:00pm

Earth Science Data Analytics Tools, Techniques and More
The Earth Science Data Analytics (ESDA) Cluster has made great strides in understanding the utilization of data analytics in Earth science, an area virtually untouched in the literature. In achieving its goal to support advancing science research that increasingly includes very large volumes of heterogeneous data, the ESDA Cluster is in the process of categorizing existing tools and techniques utilized in Earth science data analytics data preparation, reduction, and analysis. This session will provide a student's 'student of Data Science' point of view showcasing the usage and usability of Data Analytics. This will set the stage to address a more detailed ESDA categorization, and begin the discussion on how best to perform the gap analysis between data analytics research needs and tools/techniques available.


Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

4:00pm

Ontologies and the Semantic Web - An Introduction for Non-Experts
What is an ontology? As a geoscientist/researcher/data manager what can Semantic Technologies do for me? This tutorial and introductory session takes attendees through the process of defining what an ontology is, where to find them, and what the collection of Semantic Technologies can do for the geosciences. We will explore what tools and semantic models are currently available, where to find them, and what one might do with them once they're found. Examples of existing and diverse geoscience sematic applications will be presented and demoed. We will also explore new application and collaboration areas within ESIP as well as explore potential limitations of such technologies.

Speakers

Wednesday July 20, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

5:30pm

Research as Art
At this year’s Summer Meeting we'll hold Research as Art on the evening of Wednesday, July 20. Our goal is to encourage the ESIP community to use visual media to communicate their data and research; and to think about their research as an ongoing narrative that can be told through visual media.

This event is about showing how the ESIP community uses data. You don’t need to consider yourself an artist in order to submit a piece. The idea is to have a range of entries that show the diversity of research done by members of our community, as well as their creativity and the impact of their work, in an engaging and accessible way. 

Wednesday July 20, 2016 5:30pm - 8:00pm
Other: 21C Museum Hotel 111 Corcoran St, Durham, NC 27701
 
Thursday, July 21
 

8:00am

State of the Federation: 2016 Summer Meeting
Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Ontology Design Pattern-driven Linked Data Publishing
In recent years, Linked (Open) Data has emerged as a prominent framework for publishing structured data on the Web adopted by various domains including geosciences. Linked Data allows data from different sources to be interlinked using HTTP Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) and be machine-processable in a standard way via the Resource Description Framework (RDF). Interoperability and integration across different datasets are achieved by the use of vocabulary that is agreed upon by the community or standardized by some governance body. Such a vocabulary is often specified in an ontology, which formalizes the semantics of the vocabulary terms being used. The challenge is that many ontologies, including domain ontologies, are too complicated, restrictive, and difficult to use and understand. This makes many linked data publishers avoid ontologies and prefer to simply use less formal vocabulary. Although this allows linked data publishing staying relatively simple, the resulting datasets would only have a low quality metadata, making the datasets harder to understand, interoperate, and integrate. In this tutorial lecture, we shall introduce a modular ontology architecture based on the so-called ontology design patterns, which are sufficiently flexible, easier to understand, and less restrictive, while allowing the linked datasets to be equipped with a sufficiently high quality metadata, enabling interoperability and easier integration across semantically heterogeneous datasets. We will demonstrate how such an ontology architecture works in a data integration setting, catering multiple perspectives from different data providers, as well as accommodating existing vocabulary that are already employed by the community.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

The state of OpenSearch and the way forward for Discovery + Validation of Services, data and metadata
The ESIP Discovery cluster has made significant contributions in the field of earth data discovery with their championing of Open Search and the provision of Best Practices and Validators for that protocol. Organizations like CEOS, CNES and OGC have taken note and provided compatible directions. In this session we will do the following, Recap the state of Open Search with respect to ESIP Report on the state of our community outreach with Open Search implementations, where we assist organizations in making their APIs compliant and, consequently, more interoperable. Talk about where we will go next OPeNDAP Best Practices - you've discovered your data, now what are you going to do with it Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) - although ESIP Discovery recommends using Open Search for discovery we understand that many organizations are tied to CSW. So let's get them working the best they can.
________________

Now days organizations are making available data (e.g. vector data, rasters) via web services, that follow open standards and are easier to integrate with other data. Validation of these services is important to guarantee that clients (e.g. web portals, mobile applications) can properly discover and download the data that a user needs. Validation can also serve as curation process to improve discovery on registries [1][2] or for certification purposes [3]. This session will provide an overview and a demo of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Validation tools. The participants will understand how to invoke a test and install the tools in their own environment. The validation tools are used to test servers, data and clients. The tests can be customized to not only test implementations against OGC standards but also community profiles. The validation engine and the tests are available as open source in GitHub. [1] ESIP Discovery Cluster Testbed: Validate and Relate Data & Services - Draft - http://commons.esipfed.org/node/406 [2] Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geosciences Interoperability - http://earthcube.org/group/cinergi [3] OCG Validation Website - http://cite.opengeospatial.org/teamengine/
 

Speakers
avatar for Luis Bermudez

Luis Bermudez

Executive Director | Innovation Program, OGC
Making this world a better world, leadership, sharing and finding data, web interfaces, validation, Semantic Web, Testbed 13, OGC innovation, OGC standards.


Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom A

9:00am

CMR (Common Metadata Repository) Metadata Curation
This session focuses on Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) activities for improving the discovery, access, use and understanding of Earth observations. High quality metadata is essential for achieving these goals. This session will feature two talks focused on NASA's Common Metadata Repository (CMR). The first talk will present the results of a CMR metadata completeness evaluation. This comprehensive evaluation included 16,000 metadata records in four dialects from seventeen CMR repositories. The second talk will focus on progress to date on the NASA Common Metadata Repository (CMR).

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom B

9:00am

Connecting Communities: identifying synergies between international integration initiatives
An increasing number of data and cyberinfrastructure communities of practice vie for Earth science practitioners' attention and time. ESIP, EarthCube, RDA, ICSU-WDS, DataOne, USGEO, GEO, COOPEUS, CODATA and USGS CDI are a non-exhaustive list. These communities have similar goals and host parallel working groups that support the mission of advancing scientific research through data interoperability. There is great diversity in the maturity of these organizations and it is clear that there is much to be learned from and with each other. Volunteer fatigue has become a serious obstacle to advancing the important efforts of these organizations, and we recognize that better communication and collaboration across organizations can help alleviate this problem. This session will focus on actively identifying synergistic activities and will create a plan for dissemination and maintenance of this dialog. We build on the foundation of previous meetings and projects such as EarthCube's Mapping the Landscape tool. Our goals are to expose active groups with exemplary achievements, connect organizations to leverage each other's expertise and knowledge base, and determine gaps to be filled. Join us for a working session to identify and connect opportunities between different communities of practice.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Hsu

Leslie Hsu

Coordinator, Community for Data Integration, U.S. Geological Survey
VH

Viv Hutchison

Science Data Management Program Manager, US Geological Survey
Data Management!
avatar for Lindsay Powers

Lindsay Powers

Deputy Director of Earth Sciences, The HDF Group
Community development, Metadata, Integrative Earth Science, fly fishing, paddling, food


Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom C

9:00am

Deep Data: Managing and Accessing Data at the Parameter Level
In order to develop tools that access large quantities of data, we must go beyond the data collection and data granule level. We must be able to both manage and access data at the level of the parameters (aka variables, or measurements) inside the files. A number of applications (e.g., Giovanni, Live Access Server) and standards (e.g., WCS) attempt to do this, but are impeded by the typical ways in which the data are stored, catalogued and inventoried. This session will provide a survey of key applications and technologies that access data at the parameter/measurement/variable level, as well as how data are typically managed. It will be followed by a working session at which we roll up our sleeves in order to make progress on improving the management of such data to make them easier for applications to work with. The key questions to be answered in this session are: What major Earth science tools work with data at the Measurement-Parameter-Variable level? How is Measurement/Parameter/Variables information used by that application? Visualization, Subsetting, Selection Forms, Discovery? Where is that information stored and how is it obtained and maintained?

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, ESDIS


Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom D

9:00am

Climate Literacy Collective Impact - Developing a Strategy
In recent years there have been a plethora of climate and energy literacy efforts, government funded and community based to enable individuals, professionals, organizations, and governments to make effective decisions within their realms of responsibility. Individually these efforts have limited reach, impact, and duration. We are seeking to enable broader reach, impact and sustainability through the development of effective Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort framed on the collective impact model described by Kania and Kramer (2011). In this Working Session we will build on input the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) has received through ongoing discussions and surveys. This input suggests an effective strategy for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort is to enable a network of networks. The specific focus of the session will be to develop a template for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact Network at the regional/metropolitan scale and how it might fit into a coordinating overarching network that would coordinate and leverage the regional/metropolitan networks across the country. Resources Google Doc summarizing input received from multiple professional meeting opportunities (Dec 2012-Feb 2014) at http://tinyurl.com/Summaryofmgwndtr) Results from 2013 CLEAN Network Survey (published in the Journal of Geoscience Education http://dx.doi.org/10.5408/13-057.1) AGU 2015 Workshop - Increasing Climate Literacy Through Collective Impact, Breakout group discussions http://tinyurl.com/jmrf42c Kania and Kramer, Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 9(1), 36-41, http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact), 2011. Actions This will be a Working Session. There will be invited participants who will be addressing developing a template for building a regional/metropolitan area climate literacy collective impact effort. We need a full day of breakout sessions. I think they are 1.5 hours each and there are 4 in a day. The 4 can be broken over two days if the plenary sessions require that. While we will have invited participants attendees of the ESIP Federation meeting are welcome to participate in the discussions. Ledley needs to leave in the afternoon of Thursday July 21 to particpate in the Earth Educators Rendezvous in Wisconsin so these session must be complete by then.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Meeting Room 3 & 4

11:00am

'NASA GIBS/Worldview Visualization - Granules / Vectors / Curtains'
NASA's evolving Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) project provides raster imagery for a wide range of geophysical parameters across EOSDIS missions. This imagery is available through a set of web services and associated standard interfaces which facilitate efficient transmission of raster layers to mapping clients which consume geospatial imagery for a wide spectrum of applications. The varied types of Earth science data within the ever-growing holdings of EOSDIS require GIBS to expand and evolve beyond its current operational focus of serving daily global and polar raster composites. This ESIP session focuses on presenting current and planned GIBS development activities for the purpose of soliciting comments, questions, and user scenarios. Topics include visualization support for: Sub-Daily Data (per science product file/granule) - Visualization of individual data files, which typically have a temporal coverage that is less than one day. Common use cases include visualizing single swaths/granules/scenes. Vector-Based Data - Visualization of vector-based data in non-raster formats. Common use cases include client-side styling, efficient tiling scheme's, etc. Considered vector products include orbit/ship tracks, dense data products, and gridded (varying by zoom level) products. Curtains/Vertical Profiles - Visualization of non lat/lon data products that are best visualized along a "z axis", often associated with elevation or pressure level. Interactive Analysis (R&D work) - Data visualization techniques facilitating direct interaction with the source science data behind the GIBS imagery, locally within a browser or science tool.

Speakers
RB

Ryan Boller

Data Visualization Lead, ESDIS Project


Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Grand Ballroom

11:00am

Interdisciplinary Data Curation for Socio-Environmental Research
In the Earth Sciences, many researchers are striving to address larger environmental challenges. From understanding our changing climate, to surface processes that result in water issues, deforestation, biodiversity loss - these earth science questions can be framed at various spatial scales, ranging from local to global. These complex earth systems are best understood not just through any one disciplinary approach, but through an interdisciplinary lens. Research on these complex, systems science problems, then, is often better organized around the site (geographic location) instead of by discipline. This has implications for: Data collection and management: sampling sites must be well documented and contextualized, and data must be collected in a way that is usable and interpretable for researchers in a range of fields Data sharing and archiving: repositories must take steps to avoid becoming disciplinary silos, and researchers must take additional steps in their metadata creation Data analysis: researchers must be careful in scaling up the understanding / knowledge from site-specific to regional or global levels This is especially true when considering that many environmental challenges within the earth sciences have a human/social component, often bringing social-science research (economics, psychology, decision-making) into the interdisciplinary fold. There are organizations, such as SESYNC, addressing social-environmental problems via case studies and interdisciplinary data analytics, and this Session is intended to bring the ESIP community into the conversation. This Session will look at specific case studies and discuss ways in which the ESIP community might be able to offer insights into the data management and analytics necessary for addressing interdisciplinary research more broadly. Case Studies: Yellowstone: geobiology at Mammoth Springs Los Angeles, California: paleontology and paleoecology research at the La Brea Tar Pits Agricultural Sites: Ecosystem Services (Climate, Water Quality and Farmer Livlihoods) Vermont Vermont Monitoring Cooperative (present brief series of Case Studies or general overview) Possible Speakers: Andrea Thomer Lindsay Barbieri Jim Duncan, Vermont Monitoring Cooperative Steve Posner, works with COMPASS - http://www.compassonline.org/staff/StephenPosner Hoperful Collaborations with ESIP Clusters: Data Stewardship Interoperability Data Analytics

Speakers
LB

Lindsay Barbieri

University of Vermont


Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

11:00am

The ISO Landscape
Many members of the ESIP community use ISO metadata standards to describe their data and services or are interested in doing that in the future. We will describe and answer questions about recent developments in those standards and demonstrate related ESIP resources.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

11:00am

Application of Cloud Computing for Geoscience Analytics
The objective of this session is to share innovative concepts, emerging solutions, and applications of Cloud Computing for Geoscience Analytics. The elasticity of Cloud Computing enables us to horizontally scale of big data analytic solutions to be able to handle more data at the same time. Topics include demonstration, studies, methods, solutions and/or architectural discussion on Architecture for big data analytic Application of open source technologies Automated techniques and solutions for data analysis Browser-based data analytics and visualization Real time decision support Invited speakers Mike Little - NASA ESTO, AIST Managed Cloud Environment Brett McLaughlin - ESDIS/N-GAP Brian Wilson/Thomas Huang - JPL - NEXUS - Deep Data Analytic Platform Fei Hu/Zhenlong Li- GMU - A High Performance Framework for Big Climate Data Analytics Hook Hua - JPL - Machine Learning applied on SAR processing

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Huang

Thomas Huang

Technical Group Supervisor, JPL


Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

11:00am

Deep Data Working Session: Interoperabie Access to Data at the Parameter Level
In this session, application developers and data catalog providers will work together towards developing interoperability for data at the parameter/measurement/variable level. We will look at existing frameworks in an attempt to reuse or rework existing schemes in order to support multiple applications Some of the schemes in the community to be considered are: CSDMS Standard Names CF Standard Names RDA Datatypes Registry EOSDIS Unified Metadata Model for Parameters (UMM-P) OGC Web Coverage Service AESIR ODISEES The key questions to be addressed are: Is it possible to support Measurement-Variable-Parameter information for all the key applications in a single framework? Alternatively, should we try to link or map amongst several frameworks? In either case, what process should be used to maintain the framework contents or mappings between them?

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, ESDIS


Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

11:00am

Towards a Data Commons for the Geosciences
Modern scientific discovery, particularly in the geosciences, is driven by a model which entails collaboration around data and software by teams of specialized experts. Common to these collaborations is the need to share and control data and descriptions of the data, to share compute resources and tools, to share and develop code, the need to move data between compute resources and team members, and the need to save and publish data and results. Several groups have been developing technological solutions to enable data-centric collaborations based on the concept of a data commons. However, the notion of a data commons and what constitutes a data commons is not well defined. We propose a workshop to discuss what a data commons should provide for the Geoscience community based on some representative science use cases, where we are today, and what needs to be accomplished.


Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

11:00am

Climate Literacy Collective Impact - Developing a Strategy
In recent years there have been a plethora of climate and energy literacy efforts, government funded and community based to enable individuals, professionals, organizations, and governments to make effective decisions within their realms of responsibility. Individually these efforts have limited reach, impact, and duration. We are seeking to enable broader reach, impact and sustainability through the development of effective Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort framed on the collective impact model described by Kania and Kramer (2011). In this Working Session we will build on input the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) has received through ongoing discussions and surveys. This input suggests an effective strategy for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact effort is to enable a network of networks. The specific focus of the session will be to develop a template for a Climate Literacy Collective Impact Network at the regional/metropolitan scale and how it might fit into a coordinating overarching network that would coordinate and leverage the regional/metropolitan networks across the country. Resources Google Doc summarizing input received from multiple professional meeting opportunities (Dec 2012-Feb 2014) at http://tinyurl.com/Summaryofmgwndtr) Results from 2013 CLEAN Network Survey (published in the Journal of Geoscience Education http://dx.doi.org/10.5408/13-057.1) AGU 2015 Workshop - Increasing Climate Literacy Through Collective Impact, Breakout group discussions http://tinyurl.com/jmrf42c Kania and Kramer, Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 9(1), 36-41, http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact), 2011. Actions This will be a Working Session. There will be invited participants who will be addressing developing a template for building a regional/metropolitan area climate literacy collective impact effort. We need a full day of breakout sessions. I think they are 1.5 hours each and there are 4 in a day. The 4 can be broken over two days if the plenary sessions require that. While we will have invited participants attendees of the ESIP Federation meeting are welcome to participate in the discussions. Ledley needs to leave in the afternoon of Thursday July 21 to particpate in the Earth Educators Rendezvous in Wisconsin so these session must be complete by then.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Meeting Room 3 & 4

2:00pm

OPeNDAP Workshop 2016 -- Emphasizing Advances for EOSDIS
During the upcoming Summer 2016 meeting of the ESIP Federation (July 19-22), OpenDAP will hold a Developers and Users Workshop. While many topics will be covered, a focus is to capitalize on recent EOSDIS-sponsored advances in Hyrax, OPeNDAP's own software for server-side realization of the DAP2 and DAP4 protocols. These Hyrax advances are as important to data users as data providers, and the workshop will include hands-on experiences of value to both. Specifically, a balanced set of presentations and hands-on tutorials will address advances in server installation, server configuration, Hyrax "aggregation" capabilities, support for data-access from clients that are HTTP-based, JSON-based or OGC-compliant (especially WCS and WMS), support for DAP4, use and extension of server-side computational capabilities, and several performance-affecting matters. Topics 2 through 7 will be relevant to data consumers, to data providers and--notably, because all OPeNDAP software is open source--to developers interested in extending Hyrax, building compatible clients, or employing Hyrax as middleware that enables interoperability across a variety of end-user and source-data contexts. A session for contributed talks will elaborate or augment the listed topics. Please plan to attend and to share your own OPeNDAP-related work, whether emphasizing clients, servers or DAP-based middleware. Previous workshops have engendered many interesting ideas, and the most recent one (ESIP Summer Meeting of 2014) yielded participant requests for this year's reprise. Submit ideas for sessions or abstracts for presentations to abstracts@opendap.org by May 31st, 2016.


Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

Making the connection: How organizations are institutionalizing the use of persistent identifiers to link data, publications, people, and institutions
Persistent identifiers are powerful tools that allow us to unambiguously link objects and information. We now have a number of different systems of persistent identifiers for data, publications, people and institutions. The question is how are organizations taking advantage of these persistent identifiers to create meaningful links? How are institutions encouraging or enforcing the use of persistent identifiers? For example, how are organizations institutionalizing the use of ORCIDs or ResearchIDs among their staff and how are they ensuring that those identifiers are linked to an author's publications and datasets? How are organizations ensuring that there are links between publications and datasets? What types of changes both technological and cultural need to happen in order to fully connect all of the parts and pieces of our science to tell a meaningful, accurate, and persistent story? This session will feature a few successes and challenges from organizations that have made these connections and how they did it, as well as a discussion of how others can initiate the implementation of persistent identifiers.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Arko

Bob Arko

Tech. Director, UNOLS/R2R
avatar for Bob Downs

Bob Downs

CIESIN
Dr. Robert R. Downs serves as the senior digital archivist and acting head of cyberinfrastructure and informatics research and development at CIESIN, the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, a research and data center of the Earth Institute of Columbia University... Read More →
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication
avatar for Madison Langseth

Madison Langseth

U.S. Geological Survey


Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

2:00pm

NOAA OneStop Data Discovery and Access Framework Project: Progress, Feedback, and Alignment with the USGEO Common Framework on Earth Observation Data
The NOAA OneStop Data Discovery and Access Framework Project was initialized in FY15 and is now working rapidly to improve discovery and access to NOAA's data. This session is a follow-on to the Winter ESIP 2016 OneStop session in which the project was introduced to the community and initial feedback on approaches being taken was collected. That feedback helped confirm the general direction of the project and its reliance on standards-based services, rigorous ISO 19115 metadata, and relevance ranking improvements, for example. During the summer meeting, we will feature a combination of presentations and discussions to further inform the ESIP community, demonstrate progress on the various layers of the project, explore synergies with similar efforts taking place at other ogranizations, and to solicit more community feedback on OneStop. A key aspect of the discussion will be to explore the alignment of OneStop with the new USGEO Common Framework for Earth Observation Data.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

2:00pm

Big Data and Cloud Computing Expert Panel
Cloud computing is no longer an emerging technology. It has become a key player in many of our architectural considerations. This panel discussion consists of experts from science data systems, data centers, and enterprise systems to discuss their current projects, results from their studies, architectural approaches, and deployment strategies for Cloud computing. Jeff DLB - NOAA Data Management Architect Mike Little - ESTO Hook Hua - JPL/SWOT Science Data System deployment strategies Myche McAuley - JPL/PO.DAAC/SWOT Data Archive Dan Pilone - Moving to Cloud-Native Architecture for EOSDIS Applications

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Huang

Thomas Huang

Technical Group Supervisor, JPL


Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

2:00pm

Transforming Earth Sciences Big Data into Actionable Products for Disaster Applications Part 1
The Disaster Life Cycle Cluster coordinates efforts among data providers, managers and developers of disaster response systems and tools, and end-user communities within ESIP. We continue working on the testbed, ESIP GeoCollaborate(TM), to facilitate sharing and validation of data products in a collaborative Common Operating Picture (COP) and tools to benefit every phase of the disaster life cycle. We are coordinating with two disasters management communities, the California Earthquake Clearinghouse and the All Hazards Consortium, to better understand user needs and challenges. In addition to showcasing results with the ESIP GeoCollaborate(TM) testbed, this session will discuss experience with the June 2016 Cascadia Rising Exercise, and interactions with the All Hazards Consortium. Speakers "Trusted Data Sharing and Imagery Workflow for Disaster Response in Partnership with the State of California: Cascadia Rising 2016 and Beyond" presented by Maggi Glasscoe, Anne Rosinski, and Phil Beilin "GeoCollaborate(TM) ESIP Testbed Evolution into Operational Environments" presented by Dave Jones/StormCenter Communications Inc.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

2:00pm

EnviroSensing Collaboration Area: Sensors and Sensibility
The ESIP EnviroSensing Collaboration Area was organized around the need to create resource guides and share deployment strategies for real-time sensor networks. This session is intended to provide a forum for sharing current research efforts in the management of sensor networks and sensor data and will feature the following talks: Janet Fredericks will describe an update on the X-DOMES project (Cross-Domain Observational Metadata Environmental Sensing) funded by NSF as part of the EarthCube Integrative Activities. The X-DOMES project's primary goal is to work with sensor manufacturers to encourage them to begin to fully-describe sensors using a combination of controlled-vocabularies, OGC-SWE, SensorML and the Semantic Web. This update will feature the importance of sensor and processing metadata and in creating standardized methods for communicating this information. Mike Botts will focus on the OpenSensorHub which allows you to easily, rapidly, and affordably transform networked sensors into a seamless SensorWeb of real-time, location-aware, interoperable, web accessible services. Vasu Kilaru will discuss the elements necessary to take full advantage of new sensor technologies. The development and proliferation of new sensor technology and the internet of things (IoT) is having a profound effect on environmental monitoring. Once the purview of government and academia, sensors have democratized this function such that anyone has the capability to do environmental monitoring of things like air quality and water quality. But in order for this brave new world of cell phones and sensors to contribute constructively to society a number of structural/infrastructural developments are needed. The EnviroSensing Collaboration Area welcomes other related talks or reports into this session.


Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

4:00pm

OPeNDAP Workshop 2016 -- Emphasizing Advances for EOSDIS
During the upcoming Summer 2016 meeting of the ESIP Federation (July 19-22), OpenDAP will hold a Developers and Users Workshop. While many topics will be covered, a focus is to capitalize on recent EOSDIS-sponsored advances in Hyrax, OPeNDAP's own software for server-side realization of the DAP2 and DAP4 protocols. These Hyrax advances are as important to data users as data providers, and the workshop will include hands-on experiences of value to both. Specifically, a balanced set of presentations and hands-on tutorials will address advances in server installation, server configuration, Hyrax "aggregation" capabilities, support for data-access from clients that are HTTP-based, JSON-based or OGC-compliant (especially WCS and WMS), support for DAP4, use and extension of server-side computational capabilities, and several performance-affecting matters. Topics 2 through 7 will be relevant to data consumers, to data providers and--notably, because all OPeNDAP software is open source--to developers interested in extending Hyrax, building compatible clients, or employing Hyrax as middleware that enables interoperability across a variety of end-user and source-data contexts. A session for contributed talks will elaborate or augment the listed topics. Please plan to attend and to share your own OPeNDAP-related work, whether emphasizing clients, servers or DAP-based middleware. Previous workshops have engendered many interesting ideas, and the most recent one (ESIP Summer Meeting of 2014) yielded participant requests for this year's reprise. Submit ideas for sessions or abstracts for presentations to abstracts@opendap.org by May 31st, 2016.


Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom

4:00pm

A Framework to Evaluate the Return on Investment (ROI) of a Data Repository
This working session will continue the efforts initiated at the Tempe Workshop in November, 2015 and continued at the ESIP 2016 Winter Meeting. For background information, please see below. All are invited. This effort seeks to develop a framework to evaluate the return on investment (ROI) of a data repository, providing help in determining the value of data and services around them to stakeholders of varying perspectives. Our agenda for this working session is to: 1) BRIEFLY recap the summaries of our discussions of the references provided on this page: http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Return_on_Investment_ROI_References. This is only a recap as we expect to more thoroughly discuss these references via telecons leading up to this session. We request that participants in the session either participate in those telecons or peruse the references beforehand in order to arrive up to speed at the session. The summaries are very short reviews of the references with respect to these issues and questions: ? How is value (to stakeholders) defined / discussed? ? What are the definitions / explanations / categories of repository stakeholders? ? How were similarities among data repositories defined / discussed? ? How were differences among data repositories defined / discussed? ? What, if any, were the metrics used to measure the value(s) returned to repository stakeholders? ? What do the references say about the reason(s) for caring about this topic? b) Discuss potential funding possibilities for a planning grant to develop this idea and scope some work. We will lay groundwork for this part of the discussion beforehand by investigating possible funding opportunities and their requirements and goals, also via our telecons. c) Target one of these possibilities and develop an outline for a proposal that takes into account their requirements, schedule, project scope, etc. Background In November 2015 representatives from various data repositories, data service providers, and others participated in a two and one half day workshop in Tempe, AZ, sponsored and funded by NSF, to discuss collaborative strategies for sustained environmental data management. As an introduction, see the following quote from a briefing document participants received before the workshop: "Many environmental data repositories were initiated to fulfill specific needs or objectives, i.e. archiving and disseminating data from a project, network of research sites, institution, funding source, to accompany paper publications, or more recently, as data papers. This initiative was funded with the goal of exploring how we might develop this network of repositories in a way that will produce new collaboration and curation strategies that also cater to the currently underserved single investigators and move environmental data from 'available' to 'usable', in order to accelerate scientific inquiry. With this goal in mind we are bringing together data curators from a range of environmental research fields, data aggregators, tool developers, computer scientists and environmental scientists (both data providers and users) for an informed dialog which draws on our collective experience managing data and repositories." Several of the topics that surfaced during the workshop garnered enough interest from participants to request that discussions continue under the auspices of a new ESIP cluster Those topics have coalesced to be: ? Defining a Return on Investment (ROI) of Data Repositories for Society ? Conducting a Landscape Analysis and Gaps for Environmental Data Repositories and Describing a Common Technical Vision The ESIP cluster, Sustainable Data Management, was recently formed. The wiki page is http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Sustainable_Data_Management. The ROI working group exists under this cluster. Notes from the ROI session at the ESIP Winter Meeting and other information are available at http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Return_on_Investment_Subgroup_%28ESIP_....

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

4:00pm

Who said a catwalk can't be a bridge?
Got an R-based model looking to strut its style? ArcGIS has an R bridge, new scientific python libraries, and multi-dimensional support. This session will work with you to showcase your models and science on the research runway. Working together in advance and then together in the session, we'll look at the models through these different tools, and through the bridge show how to broaden community access to your research and results. The idea is to connect up some of your data, models, and methods to the out of the box tools to see what new analysis, visualizations, and end-user collaborations can result.

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

4:00pm

Cloud Computing Hands-On and Hack-a-Thon Workshop
We will design a short hands-on workshop to introduce how to use cloud computing based on private or public cloud of end users' choices. Participants are also encouraged to bring a light weight problem to be running on the cloud in a hack-a-thorn fashion. The workshop is organized by CC, P&S, IT&I, and supported by the NSF Spatiotemporal Innovation Center with it's hybrid cloud service and Amazon. This session could accomodate 25 participants with a first come first serve mechanism. Bringing your own laptop is required and please bring your application (ideas) to be put on the cloud. Please indicate your participants by signing up at sched https://2016esipsummermeeting.sched.org/event/6uHO/cloud-computing-hands.... 1. Brief Intro to Cloud Computing (5-10 minutes) 2. Hands-on Overview (5-10 minutes) 3. Hands-on & Hack-a-Thorn (70-80 minutes)

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Huang

Thomas Huang

Technical Group Supervisor, JPL


Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

4:00pm

Transforming Earth Sciences Big Data into Actionable Products for Disaster Applications Part 2
The Disaster Life Cycle Cluster coordinates efforts among data providers, managers and developers of disaster response systems and tools, and end-user communities within ESIP. We developed a working definition of the disaster life cycle phases. One cluster goal is to work with user communities to identify the information model and observations/outputs needed to enhance their decision-making. This session will address cluster goals to identify, promote and showcase trusted authoritative data sources and products for disaster decision. We will explore ideas for capturing requirements and processes for managing trusted data sources. We have an invited presentation by Dr. Jim Morentz to discuss experience with XchangeCore and SpotOnResponse within FEMA as well as the California Earthquake Clearinghouse. ESIP has acquired the Open Science Framework and we may consider how this shared workspace tool might be used to manage dataset evaluations. We may also leverage ideas from the data maturity matrix under development by the ESIP data stewardship cluster. This will lead to a workshop proposal to engage decision makers in discussions on availability of relevant Earth observation data and products and to better understand their information needs throughout the disaster life cycle. Speakers "Experience with XchangeCore and SpotOnResponse" presented by Dr. Jim Morentz/JWMorentz LLC "Data Driven Decision Making for Disasters - A proposed ESIP Workshop" discussion lead by Dave Jones/StormCenter Commnications

Speakers

Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

4:00pm

ToolMatch Sprint: Be Part of the Geoinformation Blueshift!
Have you ever sat in front of your computer for hours on end looking for data? Or looking for data in a certain format? Or looking for tools that are able to visualize data in a certain format? Have you ever sat back and thought to yourself, "There has got to be a better way to do this!" So do we. Join us in a hands-on workshop to collaboratively build the relationships among data, tools, scientific research and research outputs. This is not a hackathon. There is no need for coding (although, you're welcome to code if that's how you roll). This 90 minute sprint event brings together researchers, students, coders, librarians and anyone else from the wider ESIP community to contribute their knowledge, experience, and questions around data collections, data sets, data types, visualization tools, tool capabilities, and the like. We've got some ideas of how to describe those relationships that we're working with in the ToolMatch project, but want to test our world view against your reality. So, bring your data or what you know about them. Bring your tools, toolkits, scripts and a loosely formed conceptualisation of the capabilities you'd like to see in Earth science informatics research.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Huffer

Beth Huffer

Information Systems Engineer, Lingua Logica LLC
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, ESDIS
SS

Soren Scott

The Ronin Institute


Thursday July 21, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

6:00pm

 
Friday, July 22
 

8:00am

FUNding Friday Pitch-It Event
Friday July 22, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Workshop to develop CRT (Climate Resilience Toolkit) Case Studies
This Workshop continues the theme of a similar session (jointly Ag&Climate Cluster and Energy & Climate Workgroup) at the ESIP Winter Meeting in Washington, DC on CDI (Climate Data Initiative), CRT (Climate Resilience Toolkit), and ongoing work that could form the bases for CRT Case Studies. Workshop agenda: - Introduction to the workshop, logistics, etc. - Connection with the Telling Your Science Story session; larger goal to establish a CRT pipeline at the ESIP level - Introduction to CRT, LuAnn Dahlman - Brief description of work related to agriculture that forms the basis for a potential CRT Case Study --- Forrest Melton (NASA Ames) et al. Satellite Mapping of Drought Impacts on Agricultural Production and Land Fallowing in California's Central Valley The ongoing drought in California substantially reduced surface water supplies for millions of acres of irrigated farmland in California's Central Valley. Rapid assessment of drought impacts on agricultural production can aid water managers in assessing mitigation options, and guide decision making with respect to mitigation of drought impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of drought impacts on agricultural production and increases in fallow acreage associated with reductions in water supply. A key advantage of satellite-based assessments is that they can provide a measure of land fallowing that is consistent across both space and time. We describe an approach for monthly and seasonal mapping of fallow agricultural acreage developed as part of a joint effort by USGS, USDA, NASA, and the California Department of Water Resources to provide timely assessments of land fallowing during drought events. This effort has used the Central Valley of California as a pilot region for development and testing of an operational approach. To provide quantitative measures of fallow agricultural acreage from satellite data early in the season, we developed a decision tree algorithm and applied it to timeseries of data from Landsat TM, ETM+, OLI, and MODIS. Our effort has been focused on development of indicators of drought impacts in the March - September timeframe, based on measures of crop development patterns relative to a reference period with average or above-average rainfall. To assess the accuracy of the algorithms, monthly ground validation surveys were conducted across 670 fields from March - September in 2014, 2015, and 2016. We present the approach, along with updated results from the accuracy assessment, and data and maps of land fallowing in the Central Valley. --- Phu Nguyen (UC Irvine) et al. RainSphere - a new tool for analysing global remotely sensed rainfall estimates RainSphere (hosted at http://rainsphere.eng.uci.edu) has recently been developed by the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) at the University of California, Irvine for scientific studies and applications, using precipitation estimation from remotely sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks - Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR, Ashouri et al. 2015). RainSphere has functionalities allowing users to visualize and query spatiotemporal statistics of global daily satellite precipitation for the past three decades. With a couple of mouse-clicks, users can easily obtain a report of time series, spatial plots, and basic trend analysis of rainfall for various spatial domains of interest, such as location, watershed, basin, political division, and country, for yearly, monthly, monthly by year, or daily. RainSphere allows data to speak for themselves in a way that is easily understandable by the public, thus helping to increase the number of informed participants in the conversation on climate and climate variability. - Two concurrent breakout groups, one for each of the presenters and led by them. The groups discuss and draft the incipient CRT Case Studies, using the CRT "templates." - The groups recombine and share results, thoughts, next steps, etc.

Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Grand Ballroom

9:00am

Council for Data Facilities (CDF)
Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom A

9:00am

Full Motion Video & Drone Data Processing: Collaborative Experiment
You've got the drones, and we've got some software... let's do processing. This session will report and discuss the outputs of UAV-driven research and what further information can be derived leveraging Esri's Drone2Map software in science activities and missions. We'll briefly describe how Drone2Map works and then hear from several different folks with whom we've been collaborating in the ESIP research community. They will share about their research and results, and also if/how Drone2Map brought additional insight to their work. Looking forward to reporting out on the collaboration and showing cutting edge UAV-enabled research!

Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom B

9:00am

Sustainable Data Management for Environmental Science Repositories - Summary Session
Many environmental data repositories were initiated to fulfill specific needs or objectives, i.e. archiving and disseminating data from a project, network of research sites, institution, or funding source. The sustainable data management cluster is exploring how we might develop this network of repositories in a way that produces new collaboration and curation strategies within a framework that provides a positive return on our investment (ROI). Two working group sessions at this meeting will continue the work conducted at a November 2015 workshop, in Tempe, AZ. This session will give those groups the opportunity to share additional progress, and for the larger group to consider the next steps in this process. Colleagues who have not been involved to date are welcome to attend, as we wish to extend this dialog to the broadest possible audience.

Speakers
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara


Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom C

9:00am

Metadata Improvement Lab
Complete documentation of scientific data is the surest way to facilitate discovery and reuse, particularly if you use a metadata dialect that has been standardized. What is complete metadata though? How can you be sure that what you include in the metadata is not only relevant to your organization's work, but understandable to your scientific community and beyond? In this session we will be demonstrating a process to analyze the content of metadata in many standard dialects with respect to over 20 different recommendations of particular interest to the earth, space, and ecological scientific communities. You only need a connected web browser or Microsoft Excel to participate in this hands-on activity. Participants can use metadata collections from their own organizations as long as it is submitted in advance, but we will also provide some sample data if you just want to drop in. Please contact Sean Gordon for submission details. I will use XSL prior to the lab to mine the collections for concept content. In the lab you will learn how to utilize the resultant data and a recommendation's concepts to assess the completeness of records in the collections, and how to use that information to inform an iterative design process to improve the completeness of current records and prepare future metadata creation for success. More information: http://esipfed.org/node/9254


Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Junior Ballroom D

9:00am

Semantic Technologies Committee Business and Planning Meeting
Semantic Technologies are taking a prominent role in the geosciences. As these technologies, methods, and models become more prevalent, questions arise and a strategic roadmap needs to be implemented. This session aims to foster the discussion associated with Semantic Technologies within ESIP. We will review current progress and work towards a short-term vision leading up to the Winter 2017 ESIP meeting. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, ontology portal usage, governance of ontologies and semantic software, software readiness, best practices, and lessons learned.

Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Meeting Room 1 & 2

11:00am

Agile Data Curation in the Wild - What's Your Story?
Agile data curation takes the principles of agile software development and maps them into data curation and management. The underlying principles to Agile Data Curation are a reapplication of agile software development principles to data management. A core principle of agile software development and data curation is the incremental creation of value through iterative development accompanied by frequent release. This is similar to the MPLP (More Product Less Process) idea [1] that advocates for minimal processing in order to reduce backlogs and increase access to collections. After a brief introduction to what is meant by agile curation and MPLP, we will solicit exemplars of agile curation (though it might not have been conceptualized as such at the time) in practice from participants. This will include how users/agencies have handled finding and using existing data, in-project data management, strategies for developing data documentation, and transitioning data products and documentation into systems that enable preservation, discovery and reuse. In particular, we are seeking exemplars of how agencies/users have adopted a "get it done" attitude rather than "get it perfect" mentality. Participants could be data curators, data managers, or data users, who are interested in sharing their experience. Then we plan to map the exemplar practices to the foundational principles and through comparison learn lessons for future application and begin the process of translating principles into practices that are aligned with the best exemplars out there. [1] Mark Greene and Dennis Meissner (2005) More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing. The American Archivist: Fall/Winter, Vol. 68, No. 2, pp. 208-263. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.17723/aarc.68.2.c741823776k65863 Agenda (11:00 - 12:30 Friday, July 22) 11:00 - 11:15 Conceptual Overview (Benedict, Lenhardt, Young) This overview will provide the current state of the mapping of the concepts from agile software development into the data curation space with the goal of explicitly addressing a need to define the underlying conceptual foundation for data curation that embraces the values of flexibility, openness, responsiveness to user's (and reuser's) needs, and efficiency in the development of data curation workflows and strategies. 11:15 - 12:00 Case studies - examples and disussion of a strategy and technical approach for collecting case studies to inform the development of agile data curation design patterns (all attendees - moderated by Benedict & Hills) This part of the session will focus on identifying some key examples of intentional or unintentional agile data curation case studies in an effort to have some concrete examples that we can work from in developing our strategy for collecting key elements of those case studies as input to idendifying common characteristics - ultimately feeding into a set of agile data curation design patterns that are reusable by new research data curation projects. 12:00 - 12:30 Discussion and feedback on draft Values and Principles as derived from the agile software curation principles. https://osf.io/d2bac/wiki/Draft%20Agile%20Data%20Curation%20Values%20and%20Principles/ This will be a discussion that focuses on iteration on the draft language that has been developed for what the underlying values and principles of agile data curation should be. This will be the first time we have expanded to discussion of these values and principles outside of our research team and marks the beginning of an extended community dialog about them.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication


Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Grand Ballroom

11:00am

Council for Data Facilities (CDF)
Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom A

11:00am

Drones: Explore the Landscape (Technical & Physical)
This Session Will Consist of Two Main Components: 1. Showcasing some of the technical challenges and advantages of using Drones as research tools, we will hear brief reports from the following researchers. L Barbieri who has been monitoring the effect different farming techniques have on green house gas emissions, M Messinger who use drones to monitor deforestation, and S Barberie who has been quantifying glaciers in New Zealand. Each will present on the remote sensing techniques used and address some of the challenges of the "Technical Landscape". This component will also contain time for some questions and discussion. 2. NASA intern K Bhakta will present some of the preliminary results from a survey he is conducting answering 2 questions. (1) Who's using drones for earth science currently and what/how/why/where are they doing it?, and (2) What software is out there for processing drone captured data, what formats does it support and what metadata standards does it meet? His results are being used to build part of a Drones in Earth Science resource catalog the cluster is creating. We will therefore also present to the community our move to using the ESIP Open Science Framework infrastructure as a means of enabling the cluster and community to share resources, code, and data. Finally we hope the results of Bhakta's work will prompt some community discussion around the ongoing question regarding data and metadata standards for Earth Science Drones.

Speakers
SB

Sean Barberie

University of Alaska Fairbanks
LB

Lindsay Barbieri

University of Vermont


Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom B

11:00am

Information Quality Cluster - Use Case Analysis - Working Session
The goals of the Information Quality Cluster (IQC) as expressed in the Strategic Plan are: Bring together people from various disciplines to assess aspects of quality of Earth science data Establish and publish baseline of standards and best practices for data quality for adoption by inter-agency and international data providers Build framework for consistent capture, harmonization, and presentation of data quality for the purposes of climate change studies, Earth science and applications Moving towards these goals, the IQC has been collecting use cases to help identify issues and analyze them to arrive at recommendations for improvements in capturing, describing, enabling discovery and facilitating use of data quality information. The purpose of this session is to focus on analysis of several use cases. A brief introduction will be provided to familiarize new attendees with the IQC, use cases and the analysis process. The number of use cases analyzed will depend on the attendance at the session and the number of breakout groups that can be formed. The use cases to be examined will be pre-analyzed at a very high-level to identify the technical scope and scientific theme of each use case. This will allow for the session attendees who may have relevant expertise to provide more relevant and useful insights to the use case evaluation process. The use cases being reviewed will cover a variety of technical themes including: search ranking/relevancy, metadata, flags/indicators, data processing, subsetting, and uncertainty. The Earth science themes will generally be very broad to cover most of the science disciplines being studied using satellite remote sensing, airborne, and in situ data.


Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom C

11:00am

AIST Evaluation Kickoff
Speakers
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP


Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Junior Ballroom D

11:00am

Advancing netCDF-CF
NetCDF-CF is a community-developed data standard first released in 2003. Originally designed to represent climate and forecast (CF) model output encoded in the netCDF binary format, the standard is now widely accepted in the climate, weather, remote-sensing, and other geoscience research communities. This sesion will provide a venue to discuss current and planned efforts to advance netCDF-CF. Updates will be given on current efforts to draft proposals for specific enhancements to the CF specification.

Speakers
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Friday July 22, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Meeting Room 1 & 2

12:30pm

ESIP Website Feedback Boxed Lunch
In 2016, ESIP plans to make changes to its websites and community workspaces, including esipfed.org, the Commons, Wiki and Testbed. We'll present proposed changes to the sites and hold this brainstorming session to get input from the community on these, as well as input on additional ways to improve the sites to create a better user experience. Attendees should come prepared to help identify the challenges and obstacles the community faces when visiting the ESIP sites to find information and add content. We want to understand user pain points, the flow of users through the ESIP sites, and how users access the information on the sites. All perspectives are welcome.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO @ WHOI
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies


Friday July 22, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

Telling Your Science Story
This working session is a writing lab for people interested in gaining hands-on experience in science storytelling, whether you're interested in blogging, authoring case studies or other writing and communication projects. We'll explore the process of translating science to story and then spend time putting this into practice. You'll leave the session with a better idea of how to describe your research in non-technical terms and strategies you can use on future writing and communication projects. This session is intended as a follow on to the workshop on developing Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) Case Studies and the Agile Data Curation in the Wild - What's Your Story? session, but all are welcome to attend. We'll break into two groups for the writing portion of the session: one composed of people working on case studies and the other for people working on other writing projects.

Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Grand Ballroom

2:00pm

Council for Data Facilities (CDF)
Speakers

Friday July 22, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Junior Ballroom A